Browsing "Bioprinter / Biodrucker"

First Ever 3D Printed Thyroid Gland Announced by Russia’s 3D Bioprinting Solutions

The advancements seen within the field of 3D bioprinting are simply staggering. With numerous companies spending millions of dollars on advancing such technologies, we are in the early stages of what may be one of the most important medical revolutions of our time. With 3D printed human organs promising to one day eliminate the lengthy organ transplant waiting lists, perhaps saving hundreds of thousands of lives each year, these advances can not come soon enough.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)


(Quelle: Youtube)

At SXSW TeVido Delves into the Benefits of 3D Bioprinting Breast Tissue

In previous years, SXSW Interactive has maintained health and medical technology programming, but this is the first year that the SX Health and MedTech Expo has existed in its expanded form. SXSW set up a whole slate of programming in this genre at JW Marriot, one of Austin’s shiniest hotels.
(…weiter auf 3dprintingindustry.com)

3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y and Z directions; enabling the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast crosslinking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the non-cytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. Based on these results we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.
(…weiter auf pubs.acs.org)

Animal Testing on Biodegradable 3D Printed Artificial Bone Successfully Accomplished in Xi’an, China

We all know that the future of regenerative medicine lies in technologies such as 3D bioprinting. The ability to reproduce organs, cartilage, bones, and other soft tissues found within the human body, based on a simple design from a computer model, could have staggering implications for treating a variety of ailments from cancer to heart disease to major trauma.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)

Qingdao Unique to Begin Animal Testing on 3D Printed Skin & Corneas Within 1 Year, Other Organs in 2 Years

While 3D printing has been making its mark for a couple decades within the field of rapid prototyping, it is now just beginning to break the surface when it comes to medical uses. One Chinese company, called Qingdao Unique has been working in the field of bioprinting for some time now. Now Qingdao Unique tells 3DPrint.com that they plan to 3D print corneas and skin within just one year.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)

3D Printed Algae Provides Oxygen Source for Growing Bioprinted Human Cells

Bioprinting promises to change the way we look at the field of medicine forever. As several companies are already printing living human tissue, it’s only a matter of time before many ailments can be halted via this incredible technology. Although much research still needs to be done, and experts in many different fields will need to work together for a common cause, ultimately we will one day be transplanting entire 3D printed human organs into individuals who likely would have otherwise perished.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)

Can we print a human body part?


Doctor Peng Jiang and his colleagues at the Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital are among the first in China to test 3D printing technology in the treatment of patients with bone problems.

According to online definitions, 3D printing is essentially a “layering” process in which powders are fused together layer by layer. Theoretically, any material – solid or liquid – can be fused into any shape, just like a sculpture. But the process is time-consuming and expensive, depending on the size, material and complexity of the model. Why bother, then, to use 3D technology if it takes a few hours to print a cup, when dozens can be produced in factories in far lesser time?
(Quelle und weitere Infos: Youtube)

Lebendige Knochen aus dem 3D-Drucker

Freiburger Wissenschaftler wollen Gewebe mit eingebauten Blutgefäßen drucken / Förderung durch Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
Knochen mit eigenen Blutgefäßen könnten künftig mit dem 3D-Drucker hergestellt werden. Freiburger Wissenschaftler entwickeln jetzt ein Druck- Verfahren, das aus Zellen von Knochen und Blutgefäßen funktionsfähige Knochen erzeugt. Die Gefäßzellen sollen die Durchblutung des Gewebes verbessern, indem sie eine Verbindung zum Blutkreislauf des Patienten herstellen. Für die Entwicklung dieser 3D-Druck-Methode erhalten die Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler eine dreijährige Förderung der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in Höhe von 460.000 Euro.
(…weiter auf teachersnews.net)

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