Tagged with " 3D Bioprinter"

Using 3D Printing, MakerBot and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Create Cartilage to Repair Tracheal Damage

Results are showcased at 51st Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

San Diego, CA – Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot® Replicator® 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. The results were reported today at the 51st Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons in San Diego, in a presentation by Todd Goldstein, an investigator at the Feinstein Institute, part of the North Shore-LIJ Health System. This is a first for medical research where regular MakerBot PLA Filament was used to 3D print a custom tracheal scaffolding, which was combined with living cells to create a tracheal segment.
(…weiter auf feinsteininstitute.org)

MakerBot Stories | A New Frontier in Tracheal Repair

Your trachea, or windpipe, connects the throat and lungs. Air comes in through the windpipe; carbon dioxide goes out.

If it is torn or diseased, surgeons have two ways to fix it. They can remove the damaged part and attach the healthy ends, but there’s only so much slack. Or they can extract some rib cartilage and graft it into the windpipe, which is also made of cartilage. Additional surgery has risks, however. So some patients can’t be helped.
(…weiter auf makerbot.com)

MakerBot Stories | Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

MakerBot Stories | Feinstein Institute for Medical Research from MakerBot on Vimeo.

A team of surgeons and scientists at the Feinstein Institute of Medical Research, the research branch of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, has grown cartilage on a 3D printed scaffolding, pointing the way to custom repairs for damaged and diseased tracheas, or windpipes. The cells grow on a scaffolding created from ordinary MakerBot PLA Filament on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer. “3D printing and tissue engineering have the potential to replace lots of different parts of the human body,” says Dr. Lee Smith, a pediatric otolargyngologist who participated in the research. “The potential for creating replacement parts is almost limitless.”
(Quelle: Vimeo)

Swansea University Scientists Engineer 3D Bioprinted Tissues for Pharmaceutical Research

It has been announced, that a novel application of 3D-Bioprinting living tissue models for pharmaceutical testing is being developed at Swansea University-UK. A team of scientists have begun trailing a process, which has been designed to augment the development of new drugs and treatments. The research team led by Dr. Daniel Thomas of the Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating has produced a process which uses precision deposition technologies to produce complex tissue architectures.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)

Japan researchers develop bio 3D printer to print bones, joints and human skin

It will surprise anyone in the 3D printing community to hear that the technology can be potentially life-saving; over the past year we’ve learned of numerous studies and scientific breakthroughs that could make 3D printed organs, blood vessels and skin tissue a reality over the next couple of years Just this week the Japanese government announced a whole round of investments aimed at developing 3D printable human organs.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

Advancing Tissue Engineering: The State of 3D Bioprinting

Research on various aspects of bioprinting is being conducted at numerous facilities throughout the world. Every part of the globe has begun to provide progressive steps for developing specific aspects of the bioprinting process. One of the newer research facilities is located at the University of Iowa (UI), which is working on tissue engineering. The University’s Mechanical and Industrial Department established its bioprinting lab in 2011.
(…weiter auf 3dprint.com)

Organovo Announces Commercial Release of the exVive3D™ Human Liver Tissue

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Organovo Holdings, Inc. (NYSE MKT: ONVO) („Organovo“), a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering breakthrough 3D bioprinting technology, today announced the full commercial release of the exVive3DTM Human Liver Tissue for preclinical drug discovery testing. Initially, clients will be able to access the technology through Organovo’s contract research services program. This model is intended to provide human-specific data to aid in the prediction of liver tissue toxicity or ADME outcomes in later stage preclinical drug discovery programs.

Organovo’s exVive3D Liver Models are bioprinted, living 3D human liver tissues consisting of primary human hepatocytes, stellate, and endothelial cell types, which are found in native human liver. The exVive3D Liver Models are created using Organovo’s proprietary 3D bioprinting technology that builds functional living tissues containing precise and reproducible architecture. The tissues are functional and stable for at least 42 days, which enables assessment of drug effects over study durations that well beyond those offered by industry-standard 2D liver cell culture systems.
(…weiter auf organovo.com)

PrintAlive 3D bioprinter moves to preclinical trials, could revolutionize burn treatment

3D Bioprinting is, thanks to its many medical possibilities, one of the most crucial innovations that 3D printing technology is bringing into our lives. While much of bioprinting technology is still theoretical or years away, one revolutionary innovation is coming tantalisingly close to being integrated into medical treatment: the PrintAlive 3D bioprinter.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

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