Tagged with " 3D printed object"

From Flinstones to Jetsons: Family Prosthetic Business Enters 21st Century with 3D Printing

This week, I had the pleasure of speaking with Bill and Brian Layman, the father and son team behind Innovative Orthotics and Prosthetics, their family-run prosthetics business. Bill has been in the business of designing and constructing prosthetics for forty years, saying that he’s lived through The Flintstones and The Jetsons eras of prosthetics manufacturing. And, as the second generation in their family business, Brian is helping push the company into the 21st century. With the founding of Innovative Digital Manufacturing, the team is perfecting their capacity for 3D-printed prosthetic sockets for amputees.
(…weiter auf 3dprintingindustry.com)

3D Printing an Experimental Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

If you thought rapid prototyping was mostly relevant for developing consumer goods, seemingly miscellaneous valves, or even the occasional superbike and would never play a role in completely altering the way we manufacture energy on this planet, you’ll want to hear what they’re doing over at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) being built in St. Paul-lez-Durance, France.
(…weiter auf 3dprintingindustry.com)

World’s first completely 3D printed, customized Kayak

Jim Smith of Grass Roots Engineering has created a completely 3D printed, customized Kayak. The 16ft 8in [5.08m] long Kayak is made of ABS plastic, machine screws, brass threaded inserts and a little bit of silicone caulk.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

The World’s First 3D Printed Kayak.
For more information, pictures, statistics and plans check out:
http://www.GrassRootsEngineering.com
(Quelle: Youtube / GrassRootsEng)

Online community offers 9-year-old girl a helping hand with 3D printing

When Shea, a little 9-year-old girl breaks a finger, all she has to do is 3D print a new one.

Shea was born with a palm, a two-digit thumb and no fingers on her right hand. Last year Shea saw a YouTube video about 3D printed hands and asked for one from Santa. Shea’s mom, Ranee Stollenwerk, started doing some research online. After Googling about 3D printed hands she came upon E-Nable, an online community of 3D printing hobbyists to create and improve affordable custom prosthetics for those in need.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

One of the most exciting things going on in 3D printing these days is what’s happening with 3D printed prosthetics. In particular, the e-Nable community, a group of 500 people and growing, is working to continually evolve the available options for low-cost 3D printed prosthetics. These talented folks from around the globe are creating designs that anyone can produce and assemble, wherever needed.

As a demonstration of that, here’s a video of me assembling one for the first time. I have no background in prosthetics or mechanical engineering, so if I can do this, anyone can. Of course, a prosthetist or other medical professional should always be involved when doing one of these for real, in order to ensure proper fit, check periodically for irritation, etc.

A big thanks to the great work of those who contributed to the Cyborg Beast prosthesis, including Jorge Zuniga, Frankie Flood, Ivan Owen, David Orgeman, and others in the e-Nable community.

For more information, please visit:
http://3duniverse.org
http://enablingthefuture.org

(Quelle: Youtube / 3D Universe)

Left Field Labs creates custom, 3D-printed music box that plays your tune

Left Field Labs‘ Music Drop is an integration of design of traditional music box and modern 3D printing technology. „We wanted to recreate the playfulness of a music box with a custom element.“ says Left Field Labs. It lets you design and create your own music box through a simple web interface. You just have to create a song loop and Left Field Labs will print out a music box that plays your tune.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

World’s first commercially available 3D printed custom orthotics launches

Over the past 12 months 3D Orthotics (3DO), a company based in Brisbane, Australia, has worked to develop 3D printed orthotics for full commercial use in Podiatry.

„After years of seeing patients enjoy the benefits of orthotics we noticed many common problems. Most of these problems related to the inherent lack of flexibility in the orthotic development process. Often patients feel uncomfortable with their new orthotics. They never really match the foot perfectly. Using plaster casts results in too much guess work and poor fitting of orthotics.“ notes 3D Orthotics.
(…weiter auf 3ders.org)

Contour Crafting Update

Many years ago we wrote a brief story on Contour Crafting, who, if you don’t know, are developing the technologies necessary to 3D print entire buildings in concrete. The idea is to erect a “portable” 3D printer gantry around a home-building site and have the device extrude the walls of the building.
(…weiter auf fabbaloo.com)

Icarus Had A Sister (with 200 3D Printed Feathers)

In this video interview shot at the 3D PrintShow in London, watch Masters and Munn describe the vision of their award winning sculpture „Icarus Had A Sister“ – and how, after 9 years, they were able to turn their vision into beautiful reality.

Only 3D printing could produce the more than 200 highly detailed feathers required to help the dramatic sculpture take flight.

If you want to understand why artists from virtually every media are embracing 3D printing as „a new creative tool in their belt“ as CJ Munn describes it, this video is a must.
(Quelle: Youtube / Stratasys)

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